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Bear Trail in Winter              
      

 

Scenes of the Bear Trail
in Winter

The College of the Siskiyous Bear Trail is located on the C.O.S. campus in Weed, California.  It serves as a 1.7 mile nature trail for various biology courses, and is open to the public.  Its recreational value is great, as many use it for jogging, walking their dogs or just enjoying nature.  This web page is an attempt to illustrate a winter walk on the Bear Trail from start to finish. Enjoy!!

 

Click on a picture for a larger image AND a description! 
The COS campus has a wonderful view of Mount Shasta, one of California's tallest and most beautiful
 mountains. Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a common coniferous tree located along
 the Bear Trail. Note the plate-like bark on this 
Ponderosa Pine. Greenleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula) is an evergreen shrub common 
to the Bear Trail. Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a common coniferous tree located along
 the Bear Trail. Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a common coniferous tree located along
 the Bear Trail. Note the plate-like bark on this 
Ponderosa Pine.
Ponderosa Pine. The town of Weed, California periodically 
gets snow between the months of December and March. Greenleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula) is an evergreen shrub common 
to the Bear Trail. Note the plate-like bark on this 
Ponderosa Pine. California Black Oak (Quercus kelloggii) is the most common deciduous
tree located on the Bear Trail. Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a common coniferous tree located along
 the Bear Trail.
Douglas-Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is the third most common
coniferous tree along the Bear Trail.
White Fir (Abies concolor)
 is the fourth common coniferous tree we have seen so far. White Fir (Abies concolor)
 is the fourth common coniferous tree we have seen so far. What is seen here is not leaves, but lichens.
This Douglas-Fir has lichens growing upon it. Many people mistakenly call lichens "moss", but moss is a true plant, always green in color due to chlorophyll. Lichens are rarely green. They are most often yellow, orange, red, and white. This is a close-up of the previous photo. This is a picture of the bark of an Incense Cedar.  Most use a combined knowledge of the tree's bark, leaves, and cones when identifying 
varying trees. You can see the scars of previous years' branches on this young White 
Fir. If you were walking the Bear Trail, you would be at about the halfway point.  The vegetation
 changes from deep forest to a more open forest with more shrubs and sunny exposures.
The Bear Trail provides habitat for a variety of birds.  Unfortunately, they are often shy around Humans.  
The holes in this tree were made by a woodpecker. Another view on the 'backside' of the 
trail. Pictures and captions
by Neil Schanker.
People walk the Bear Trail year round.
  Some even use snowshoes or cross-country skis.

WebPage design and
digital manipulation
by Deborah Harton.

Majestic Mount Shasta in the distance...
Pinedrops (Pterospora andromeda) is an unusual plant that has no green parts.  It gets it's nutrition 
from the roots of nearby plants.

College of the Siskiyous - Biology - Bear Trail in Winter

 


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