Courses

GEOL 0800 - Geology of Mount Shasta

Mount Shasta from the northwest, January 2002

Geology of Mount Shasta introduces the tectonic setting, eruptive history and potential hazards of Mount Shasta during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to explore volcanic and glacial features on the flanks of this massive stratovolcano which studies indicate has produced at least three major eruptions during the past 10,000 years. (NDA)


GEOL 0810 - Geology of Medicine Lake Volcano

Glass Mountain rhyolite, Medicine Lake Highlands

Geology of the Medicine Lake Volcano introduces the tectonic setting, eruptive history and potential hazards of the Medicine Lake volcano during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to explore volcanic features in the summit caldera and on the flanks of this compositionally diverse back-arc volcano which last erupted only 900 years ago. (NDA)


GEOL 0820 - Geology of Lassen National Park

Lassen Peak viewed from the south, September 2009

Geology of Lassen National Park introduces the tectonic setting, eruptive history and potential hazards of the Lassen Volcanic Center during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to explore a variety of volcanic and glacial features in the western part of the Park and includes a hike to Bumpass Hell, the second largest geothermal area in North America. (NDA)


GEOL 0830 - Geology of Crater Lake

Crater Lake caldera and Wizard Island, July 2009

Geology of Crater Lake introduces the tectonic setting, eruptive history and potential hazards of Mount Mazama and the Crater Lake caldera during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to explore a variety of volcanic and glacial features around the margin of the caldera as well as visit one of the world's most spectacular lakes. (NDA)


GEOL 0840 - Geology of the Eastern Klamath

Trinity Alps at dusk from the PCT, November 2005

Geology of the Eastern Klamath introduces the geologic structure, history and mineral resources of the Eastern Klamath Mountains during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to visit features ranging from the ancient Trinity ophiolite to the recent tailings produced by gold dredging along the Scott River. (NDA)


GEOL 0850 - Geology of Lava Beds National Monument

The Peninsula tuff cone, Lava Beds National Monument, California

Geology of Lava Beds National Monument introduces the monument's geologic setting, its tectonic and volcanic history, and its potential geologic hazards during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will give students opportunities to explore young volcanic flows and craters, climb a cinder cone and descend to the icy floor of a great lava tube. (NDA)


GEOL 0860 - Geology of the Sacramento River Canyon

Castle Crags viewed from the south

Geology of the Sacramento River Canyon introduces the canyon's geologic history, resources and potential hazards during two evening sessions and a Saturday field trip. The field trip will afford opportunities for students to visit many of the major geologic features exposed in the canyon, from the imposing Castle Crags granite to one of the spectacular caverns in the McCloud Limestone. (NDA)


GEOL 1110 - Environmental Geology

Selkirk Mountains, British Columbia, Canada

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Environmental Geology introduces fundamental environmental and geologic principles and uses these concepts to study humanity's interactions with the Earth. The course explores the origins of geologic hazards—such as earthquakes and floods—as well as strategies for mitigating their effects; the formation of Earth's resources and the limits their use place on humanity; and the environmental effects of pollution and land-use changes caused by human activities. (AA, CSU, UC)


GEOL 1120 - Geology of the National Parks

Alpenglow on Mount Corcoran, Sequoia National Park, CA

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Geology of the National Parks introduces plate tectonics, geologic dating and the formation of earth materials and uses these concepts to study how processes operating at plate boundaries and hotspots have shaped national parklands. It also explores how park landscapes fit into the larger geologic framework of North America and what they tell us about the changing roles of tectonic and surface processes during the continent's nearly four billion year history. (AA,CSU,UC)


GEOL 1130 - Geology of California

Peaks of the King Spur, Kings Canyon National Park, California

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Geology of California introduces plate tectonics, geologic dating and the formation of earth materials and uses these concepts to explore how the state's landscape has been shaped by different geologic processes as California's tectonic setting has changed during the past two billion years. It also examines the roles that these various processes have played in producing California's mineral resources and creating the geologic hazards that confront so many of the state's citizens today. (AA,CSU,UC) (C-ID: GEOL 200)

Geology 1140 - Oceonography

Marine iguana and Sally Lightfoot crabs, Parque Nacional Galápagos, Ecuador

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Oceanography introduces the major physical and biological features of Earth's oceans and examines how they are connected. It explores the geologic processes that shape the ocean basins, the forces that move seawater and influence the planet's climate and coastlines, and the changing physical conditions and selective pressures—including those caused by human activities—that affect the nature and distribution of marine life. (AA,CSU,UC)


GEOL 1210 - Physical Geology/Lab

Spatter cones, Isla Bartolome, Parque Nacional Galápagos, Ecuador

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Physical Geology explores the processes that are shaping Earth today. It examines the formation of rocks and mineral resources, the volcanic and tectonic activity that accompany release of Earth's internal heat, and the sculpting of the planet's surface that occurs as air, water and ice move in response to gravity and energy from the Sun. Lab activities include identification of rocks and minerals, interpretation of topographic and geologic maps, and field studies of regional geologic features. (AA, CSU, UC) (C-ID: GEOL 101)


GEOL 1220 - Historical Geology/Lab

Dry Falls, Sun Lakes State Park, WA

Prerequisite: ENGL 1001 and either MATH 0850 or qualification through assessment or MATH 0851 or qualification through assessment

Historical Geology explores how Earth and the life it supports have changed through time. Geologic principles are used to reconstruct the planet's origin and the events that have modified the physical environment, whereas fossils are used to trace the history of life and discover how natural selection and environmental change have shaped living communities. Lab exercises include the identification of rocks and fossils, map interpretation and field study of regional geologic history. (AA,CSU,UC) (C-ID: GEOL 111)


XNH 0500 - Volcanism in the Southern Cascades

Mount Shasta seen above the northern flank of the Medicine Lake Volcano

Volcanic landscapes in the southern Cascades have been shaped by a diverse array of eruptive and surficial processes that range from dome growth and caldera formation to flank collapse and glaciation. This course introduces the tectonic settings of selected southern Cascade volcanoes and, through a combination of classroom discussions and field trips, enables students to learn about both the geologic processes that have shaped these volcanoes and about the potential hazards that their future activity is likely to pose. (NDA)